Health Blog


Should You Move Your Elderly Parents Into Your Home?

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Taking on the responsibility of moving elderly parents into your home is not to be done lightly. While it’s become a common practice for adults turned caregivers for senior relatives, it’s an arrangement that can be a positive experience even if it has the potential to drastically change the dynamic of your relationship. But before you start to packing, you need to take certain factors into consideration that can affect you, your family, and your elderly loved one. There are financial, emotional, and medical concerns that need to be pondered as you decide whether or not to move your elderly parents into your home.

Costs

It is best to get this very difficult topic out of the way from the start. Placing an elderly parent in a nursing home or assisted care facility can be an expensive proposition, one that might be avoided by moving your parent into your home with you. But while you may be saving thousands of dollars, are you prepared to take on the other costs that are associated with bringing an elderly parent home? There are the typical monetary expenses such as food, medications, and the possible increase in costs of utilities, but other costs need to be considered as well. The amount of time that will be needed to devote to your elderly relative’s care could be substantial, as well as the potential stress and strain in your relationships with friends and family.

Health Conditions

If your parent or relative is mostly healthy, then you could have an easier time of it. However, if they are dealing with a chronic illness or another malady that prompted this idea of moving your parent into the home, then you may need to hire some kind of help. Whether it’s a home medical caregiver or in home care as an extra set of hands to be sure your parent has everything he or she requires, the state of your elderly parent’s health is going to play a large role on whether they should live with you or in a facility that is equipped to handle all of their medical needs.

Your Home

One thing that is all too often overlooked before this decision is made is the home itself. Is your home equipped to cater to an elderly occupant? Stairs can be a big challenge so you may need to install ramps or an electric stair lift. If your elderly relative can remain on the first floor of the home, is there an adequate bathroom for them to use, a bedroom they can call their own, and privacy for all parties who live in the home.

Familial Relationships

Before you bring an elderly parent home, how well do you get along with that person? Is the relationship already strained or could it become so with two very divergent outlooks on the way things are done. What about your spouse and children? Do they get along with your potential new houseguest and will there be any possible issues that might come up? These are questions you need to answer and any potential problems should have some workable solutions to make this a pleasant experience for everyone involved.